Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin ...

If deflation is a bad thing how can Bitcoin succeed?

With deflation there is less spending because people just want to hoard their money instead of spending/investing because their money will be worth more in the future. I see how Bitcoin can be successful as a store of value like gold. But I am not sure when it comes to be actual money or a monetary system. I like Bitcoin and I want it to be successful. I understand the value of network because of security done by the countless miner securing the network. Also the value of a decentralized, borderless, and unconfiscatable currency. That works 24/7 no weekends/ holidays off like our fiat system.
submitted by Neckyourself1 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Is a natural deflation due to pegging or otherwise setting a limit of a currency such as with the gold standard or the Bitcoin a bad thing?

submitted by TRIGGEREDharambe2018 to AskEconomics [link] [comments]

Why is deflation, or lowering of prices, considered a bad thing if we are talking about commodity money such as Bitcoin?

Human productivity is measured in being able to do (buy) more with less time (money). Why do we need a currency such as Ampleforth which prevents this, when at the end of the day we all want lower prices?
submitted by ethbtc to AmpleforthCrypto [link] [comments]

Why Is bitcoin's deflation not bad?

Well, since inflation in the fiat system is an incentive to spend it, is deflation in btc bad? What is the real incentive to spend over here?
submitted by PD_is_here to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

08-31 07:48 - 'Did the FED buy iphones? Furthermore, stocks do well in an inflation range of 2-5%. And you probably meant deflation which would be pretty bad for stocks.' by /u/Spl00ky removed from /r/Bitcoin within 524-534min

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Did the FED buy iphones? Furthermore, stocks do well in an inflation range of 2-5%. And you probably meant deflation which would be pretty bad for stocks.
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Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin - CoinDesk

Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin - CoinDesk submitted by whynotmranderson to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin

Contrary to expectations, bitcoin could see a positive performance during a possible bout of global deflation if it acts not just as an investment asset, but as a medium of exchange and a perceived safe haven like gold. The top cryptocurrency by market value is widely considered to be a hedge against inflation because its supply is capped at 21 million and its monetary policy is pre-programmed to cut the pace of supply expansion by 50 percent every four years. As such, one may consider any deflationary collapse as a price-bearish development for bitcoin. Talk of deflation began earlier this month after the U.S. reported massive job losses due to the coronavirus outbreak. The prospects of a deflationary collapse have strengthened with this week’s oil price crash. “The oil price rout will send a deflationary wave through the global economy,” tweeted popular macro analyst Holger Zschaepitz on Tuesday. Read more: First Mover: What the Oil Price Collapse Means for Bitcoin’s Halving Valuation Cash typically becomes king during deflation because the drop in the general price levels boosts the monetary unit’s purchasing power, or the ability to purchase goods and services. “Unlike inflation, when people try to get out of the dollar because it’s losing value, during deflation people are more comfortable with the dollar because its value is going up,” said Erick Pinos, ecosystem lead for the Americas at the public blockchain and distributed collaboration platform Ontology. The rush for cash, however, may not have a substantially negative impact on bitcoin’s price because deflation would also boost the purchasing power of the cryptocurrency. “While the price per coin may stagnate during a period of aggressive economic deflation, the inherent buying power of the currency will actually rise, possibly quite significantly,” said Brandon Mintz, CEO of the bitcoin ATM provider Bitcoin Depot. As time goes on and people become more comfortable with digital assets, the average person begins to see Bitcoin as a legitimate viable alternative to gold.** The uptick in the purchasing power will likely draw greater demand for bitcoin, as the cryptocurrency is already used as means of payment. “Hundreds of thousands of businesses, brands and merchants do accept the ‘digital gold’ as payment, and thousands more every day are realizing the benefits of diversifying their revenue stream and accepting bitcoin as payment for their goods and services,” said Derek Muhney, director of sales and marketing at Coinsource, the world’s leader in Bitcoin ATMs. Moreover, the cryptocurrency’s appeal as a medium of exchange is likely to continue strengthening with the growing prevalence of technology in consumers’ everyday lives caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
##Digital gold ##
Ever since its inception, bitcoin has been dubbed “digital gold.” Like the yellow metal, the cryptocurrency is durable, fungible, divisible, recognizable and scarce. Both assets share features that fulfill Aristotle’s call for a currency to be practical and functional. Bitcoin has actual utility as the means of payment, which gold lacks, according to Coinsource’s Muhney. “As time goes on and people become more comfortable with digital assets, the average person begins to see Bitcoin as a legitimate viable alternative to gold. Thus, it’s reasonable to assume that during a period of deflation bitcoin would perform well like gold has in the past,” said Erick Pinos, America’s ecosystem lead at the public blockchain and distributed collaboration platform Ontology. Read more: Looking for a Safe Haven Digital Asset? Try Gold Hence, gold’s performance during the previous bouts of deflation could serve as a guide for bitcoin investors. Historical data shows gold performs well during deflation, which includes a sharp rise in financial stress and increased risk of corporate defaults; highly levered companies tend to go bust during deflation because their revenues fall while their debt service payments remain the same. Of course, gold’s shine is particularly bright during periods of inflation as well. As in periods of sizable deflation, inflation brings a set of price distortions that shake-up income statements and economies. A commonly-used measure of stress is the “Ted spread” or the difference between the three-month U.S. interbank rate and the three-month T-Bill rate. Ted SpreadSource: St. Louis Fed Research“Massive spikes in the Ted spread in the 1970s were accompanied by a sharp rise in gold. The Ted spread also rose sharply in the early 1980s; in 1987 in the wake of the stock market crash and during the global financial crisis of 2007-2009 – both also periods of stronger gold prices,” according to Oxford Economics’ research note. Gold’s performance in stress periodsSource: Oxford ResearchThe real or inflation-adjusted price of gold rose an average 33 percent per annum in the 1970s, 18 percent in 1980s and 15.8 percent in 2000. Underscoring all of the scenarios is that a sudden rise in economic stress usually fuels a global dash for cash, forcing investors to sell everything from stocks to gold. However, once economic uncertainty starts settling, people again start looking for safe havens. “During the Great Recession, while gold initially declined alongside other equities, it found its footing and rallied faster than stocks recovered,” Ontology’s Pinos told CoinDesk. The Ted spread spiked as high as 4.6 following the collapse of Lehman Brothers in August 2008. Gold fell from $920 to $680 per troy ounce in the August to October period, as investors treated the yellow metal as a source of liquidity, but still ended that year with 5.5 percent gains. More importantly, it rallied by 24 percent in 2009 and went on to hit a record high above $1,900 in 2011. Read more: First Mover: Bitcoin Jumps as Fed Assets Top $6.5T and Traders Focus on Halving The yellow metal’s recent price gyrations suggest history may be repeating itself. As the Ted spread rose from 0.11 to 1.42 in the four weeks to March 27, gold fell from $1,700 to $1,450 yet is now trading near $1,725 per ounce, having hit a 7-year high of $1,747 ten days ago. Bitcoin, too, was treated as a source of liquidity last month, as evidenced from the near 40 percent drop to levels under $4,000 seen on March 12. Since then, however, the cryptocurrency has risen by nearly 85 percent to $7,500. If gold’s historical data and the recent market activity is a guide, then the path of least resistance for bitcoin appears to be on the higher side.
##Unprecedented stimulus to undermine fiat currencies ##
Both the U.S. government and the Federal Reserve have unleashed massive amounts of liquidity into the system over the past few weeks to contain the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Notably, the Fed is running an open-ended asset purchase program and its balance sheet has already risen to record highs above $6.5 trillion. Meanwhile, central banks from New Zealand to Canada have slashed rates to zero and have recently announced bond purchase programs. What’s more, the amount of fiscal stimulus announced by 22 countries in March is equivalent to 75 percent of the global gross domestic product (GDP), according to JPMorgan. However, most governments and central banks appear to have run out of ammo. Hence, if the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread or leads to corporate defaults, investors may lose trust in traditional finance and look for alternatives like bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in general. Moody’s Analytics recently warned of the heightened risk of corporate defaults in the oil and gas sector across the globe, and weakness in entertainment and leisure giving way to pressure on consumer durables. “The willingness to fight deflation should bode well for bitcoin,” said Richard Rosenblum, head of trading at GSR. Meanwhile, Ashish Singhal, CEO and founder of the cryptocurrency exchange Coinswitch.co, said, “In a deflationary scenario, the chances of negative interest rates are high, and users would want to move their existing assets into more stable assets like bitcoin to prevent loss in their asset value.” Interest rates are already set below zero across Europe and in Japan and are hovering at or near zero in other advanced countries. Further, with central banks willing to do whatever it takes to defeat deflation, the real yield or inflation-adjusted returns on bonds are likely to remain negative or meagerly positive at best. As a result, zero-yielding assets like gold and bitcoin may attract more buyers. Bank of America’s analysts noted earlier this week that the stimulus frenzy amid the coronavirus pandemic would put pressure on the currencies and send gold to $3,000 by October 2021. While bitcoin could perform well during deflation, bitcoin and cryptocurrencies have seldom tracked macro developments on a consistent basis in the past. “Blockchain-based currencies are really their own beasts,” said Bitcoin Depot CEO Brandon Mitz. DisclosureRead MoreThe leader in blockchain news, CoinDesk is a media outlet that strives for the highest journalistic standards and abides by a strict set of editorial policies. CoinDesk is an independent operating subsidiary of Digital Currency Group, which invests in cryptocurrencies and blockchain startups.
Source: https://thedailyblockchain.news/2020/05/24/why-global-deflation-may-not-be-bad-news-for-bitcoin/
submitted by iMakeWebsites4u to daily_blockchain_news [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin explains why inflation is bad and deflation is bad.

submitted by benjaminikuta to badeconomics [link] [comments]

Still think Bitcoin deflation is bad for the economy. Switzerland beg to differ

Still think Bitcoin deflation is bad for the economy. Switzerland beg to differ submitted by love_eggs_and_bacon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Krugman, trolls: to support your claim of deflation being bad in the context of bitcoin, please explain how we will see deflationary spirals like the Great Depression or 90s Japan if there is no bitcoin-denominated debt/wages/prices? If you don't, then stop using it as a handwaving argument plz thx.

Beyond using "deflation" as a simple boogeyman, I've never heard someone explain why this would be a systemically catastrophic as it has been in well known cases (US Great Depression, Japan's Lost Decade, etc.).
In those well-known cases the main problem, basically, was the deflationary spiral caused by the real value of the debt increasing, thus exacerbating the vicious cycle of lower output leading to lower wages, lower investment, lower spending, lower output, etc.
However, how does this apply to Bitcoin?
  1. How much debt is there denominated in bitcoins? Almost none.
  2. How many people have their wages denominated in bitcoin (not just paid in bitcoin, but set in bitcoin)? Almost none, and even if some do, it's probably readjusted to the dollar exchange rate every month or two or three.
  3. How many people set prices for their products in bitcoins? Besides the Bitcoin Trezor pre-order experiment, almost none, unless it's a trivial amount (for example, the price of embedding a hash of a document in the blockchain at www.proofofexistence.com) or temporary (for example, a price for a drink special at happy hour, as was the case in Miami yesterday).
"That describes the current state of the 'Bitcoin economy'", the skeptic/critic might say, "what about the future? One day there might be a lot of bitcoin-denominated debt, what then when those people can't pay it back when the value of the currency deflates?"
It's not that simple; the world is dynamic so we can't just imagine that suddenly people have bitcoin-denominated debt-- they actually have to take it on. Will they?
As our esteemed sage says in page 410 of his book Economics (Krugman, Wells, 2006), there's a difference between expected and unexpected deflation. He mentions it in the context of a liquidity trap and the inability of monetary policy to stimulate the economy due to the fact that nominal interest rates are zero bound (they can't go below zero). However, I'll use the distinction in the context of bitcoin to argue that we might never see a significant amount of lending denominated in bitcoin because agents expect deflation. Thus in only the most extreme cases, where a borrower knows that the investment they seek to finance is guaranteed to have a healthy ROI in bitcoin, will that borrower take out a loan in bitcoin at a >0% rate.
Now, perhaps these skeptics/critics might say they actually want a world with high amounts of debt, not low-debt as I've described. Fine, I'll concede that mass adoption of bitcoin as a currency might reduce the level of debt in society. (Though, I'll be happy to take that to the masses and see which side of the more-debt/less-debt argument most people fall under.)
But what I don't think they can casually say is that bitcoin adoption will lead to deflationary spirals. I'm all ears, though, if you have a more drawn out argument.
tl;dr Deflation was bad in during the Great Depression and Japan in the 1990's mainly because it was unexpected and, most importantly, debt was denominated in dollars and yen (respectively) and created a deflationary spiral. I reject the handwaving argument that "bitcoin is bad because it's deflationary", if critics/skeptics don't acknowledge that we are unlikely to see much if any bitcoin-denominated debt (nor bitcoin-denominated wages/prices.)
submitted by iwantathink to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Custodian Menace - a small number of custodians hold the private keys to a large amount of bitcoin. This is not good for Bitcoin (article by Jameson Lopp)

The Custodian Menace - a small number of custodians hold the private keys to a large amount of bitcoin. This is not good for Bitcoin (article by Jameson Lopp) submitted by TheGreatMuffin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is the Bitcoin community's response to each of the points Paul Krugman makes in this 2010 NYT piece, "Why Is Deflation Bad?"

submitted by dpxxdp to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Inflation is just as bad as deflation /r/Bitcoin

Inflation is just as bad as deflation /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

01-16 12:13 - 'Did you even read that article? Not once did it actually provide any evidence as to why deflation is better than inflation (it's not) it just stated that it is then went on about why inflation is bad, but not why deflation i...' by /u/Marmoolak21 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

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Did you even read that article? Not once did it actually provide any evidence as to why deflation is better than inflation (it's not) it just stated that it is then went on about why inflation is bad, but not why deflation is good at all. My favorite part is that the article agrees with exactly what I said happens when deflation occurs (where people hold money instead of using it), and just glosses over it.
And yes, inflation is bad, but it is believed to be better than the alternatives when you look at the overall health of the Economy.
And since you provided an article for your viewpoint (even though yours was written by Economists which you say are mostly shills for the government) I thought I should provide one for mine. It's written by a magazine catering to businessmen, so you can't dismiss it as being written by economist shills, and I didn't even have to search far and wide for an obscure school to support my argument:
[link]1
And if you want to see an example of this you don't need to look any further than crypto currency. If you look all over this subreddit you will see people telling others to hold, or that they have held since a certain price. This is happening because crypto currency is speculated to appreciate in value over time so people are afraid to spend it. If the entire world's economy used crypto then it would have already collapsed by now due to a huge economic slowdown. Crypto is, in effect, experiencing deflation right now.
Edit: Added last paragraph
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1: www.forbes.com/sites/mikepatton/2013/07/01/the-truth-behind-the-feds-monetary-expansion
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Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: r/Bitcoin explains why inflation is bad and deflation is bad. /r/badeconomics

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin explains why inflation is bad and deflation is bad. /badeconomics submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: r/Bitcoin explains why inflation is bad and deflation is bad. /r/badeconomics

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin explains why inflation is bad and deflation is bad. /badeconomics submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Inflation good, deflation bad! /r/Shitstatistssay

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Inflation good, deflation bad! /Shitstatistssay submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Discussion of Bitcoin on r/changemyview, focused mostly around the cause of deflation in BTC and whether it is a good or bad thing

Discussion of Bitcoin on changemyview, focused mostly around the cause of deflation in BTC and whether it is a good or bad thing submitted by wantsomepie to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is deflation a bad thing for Bitcoin?

submitted by TattleCoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Deflation Part 2: Is Bitcoin Price Deflation Good or Bad?

submitted by Knickerbacher to Economics [link] [comments]

Still think Bitcoin deflation is bad for the economy. Switzerland beg to differ

Still think Bitcoin deflation is bad for the economy. Switzerland beg to differ submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Putting $400M of Bitcoin on your company balance sheet

Also posted on my blog as usual. Read it there if you can, there are footnotes and inlined plots.
A couple of months ago, MicroStrategy (MSTR) had a spare $400M of cash which it decided to shift to Bitcoin (BTC).
Today we'll discuss in excrutiating detail why this is not a good idea.
When a company has a pile of spare money it doesn't know what to do with, it'll normally do buybacks or start paying dividends. That gives the money back to the shareholders, and from an economic perspective the money can get better invested in other more promising companies. If you have a huge pile of of cash, you probably should be doing other things than leave it in a bank account to gather dust.
However, this statement from MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor exists to make it clear he's buying into BTC for all the wrong reasons:
“This is not a speculation, nor is it a hedge. This was a deliberate corporate strategy to adopt a bitcoin standard.”
Let's unpack it and jump into the economics Bitcoin:

Is Bitcoin money?

No.
Or rather BTC doesn't act as money and there's no serious future path for BTC to become a form of money. Let's go back to basics. There are 3 main economic problems money solves:
1. Medium of Exchange. Before money we had to barter, which led to the double coincidence of wants problem. When everyone accepts the same money you can buy something from someone even if they don't like the stuff you own.
As a medium of exchange, BTC is not good. There are significant transaction fees and transaction waiting times built-in to BTC and these worsen the more popular BTC get.
You can test BTC's usefulness as a medium of exchange for yourself right now: try to order a pizza or to buy a random item with BTC. How many additional hurdles do you have to go through? How many fewer options do you have than if you used a regular currency? How much overhead (time, fees) is there?
2. Unit of Account. A unit of account is what you compare the value of objects against. We denominate BTC in terms of how many USD they're worth, so BTC is a unit of account presently. We can say it's because of lack of adoption, but really it's also because the market value of BTC is so volatile.
If I buy a $1000 table today or in 2017, it's roughly a $1000 table. We can't say that a 0.4BTC table was a 0.4BTC table in 2017. We'll expand on this in the next point:
3. Store of Value. When you create economic value, you don't want to be forced to use up the value you created right away.
For instance, if I fix your washing machine and you pay me in avocados, I'd be annoyed. I'd have to consume my payment before it becomes brown, squishy and disgusting. Avocado fruit is not good money because avocadoes loses value very fast.
On the other hand, well-run currencies like the USD, GBP, CAD, EUR, etc. all lose their value at a low and most importantly fairly predictible rate. Let's look at the chart of the USD against BTC
While the dollar loses value at a predictible rate, BTC is all over the place, which is bad.
One important use money is to write loan contracts. Loans are great. They let people spend now against their future potential earnings, so they can buy houses or start businesses without first saving up for a decade. Loans are good for the economy.
If you want to sign something that says "I owe you this much for that much time" then you need to be able to roughly predict the value of the debt in at the point in time where it's due.
Otherwise you'll have a hard time pricing the risk of the loan effectively. This means that you need to charge higher interests. The risk of making a loan in BTC needs to be priced into the interest of a BTC-denominated loan, which means much higher interest rates. High interests on loans are bad, because buying houses and starting businesses are good things.

BTC has a fixed supply, so these problems are built in

Some people think that going back to a standard where our money was denominated by a stock of gold (the Gold Standard) would solve economic problems. This is nonsense.
Having control over supply of your currency is a good thing, as long as it's well run.
See here
Remember that what is desirable is low variance in the value, not the value itself. When there are wild fluctuations in value, it's hard for money to do its job well.
Since the 1970s, the USD has been a fiat money with no intrinsic value. This means we control the supply of money.
Let's look at a classic poorly drawn econ101 graph
The market price for USD is where supply meets demand. The problem with a currency based on an item whose supply is fixed is that the price will necessarily fluctuate in response to changes in demand.
Imagine, if you will, that a pandemic strikes and that the demand for currency takes a sharp drop. The US imports less, people don't buy anything anymore, etc. If you can't print money, you get deflation, which is worsens everything. On the other hand, if you can make the money printers go brrrr you can stabilize the price
Having your currency be based on a fixed supply isn't just bad because in/deflation is hard to control.
It's also a national security risk...
The story of the guy who crashed gold prices in North Africa
In the 1200s, Mansa Munsa, the emperor of the Mali, was rich and a devout Muslim and wanted everyone to know it. So he embarked on a pilgrimage to make it rain all the way to Mecca.
He in fact made it rain so hard he increased the overall supply of gold and unintentionally crashed gold prices in Cairo by 20%, wreaking an economic havoc in North Africa that lasted a decade.
This story is fun, the larger point that having your inflation be at the mercy of foreign nations is an undesirable attribute in any currency. The US likes to call some countries currency manipulators, but this problem would be serious under a gold standard.

Currencies are based on trust

Since the USD is based on nothing except the US government's word, how can we trust USD not to be mismanaged?
The answer is that you can probably trust the fed until political stooges get put in place. Currently, the US's central bank managing the USD, the Federal Reserve (the Fed for friends & family), has administrative authority. The fed can say "no" to dumb requests from the president.
People who have no idea what the fed does like to chant "audit the fed", but the fed is already one of the best audited US federal entities. The transcripts of all their meetings are out in the open. As is their balance sheet, what they plan to do and why. If the US should audit anything it's the Department of Defense which operates without any accounting at all.
It's easy to see when a central bank will go rogue: it's when political yes-men are elected to the board.
For example, before printing themselves into hyperinflation, the Venezuelan president appointed a sociologist who publicly stated “Inflation does not exist in real life” and instead is a made up capitalist lie. Note what happened mere months after his gaining control over the Venezuelan currency
This is a key policy. One paper I really like, Sargent (1984) "The end of 4 big inflations" states:
The essential measures that ended hyperinflation in each of Germany,Austria, Hungary, and Poland were, first, the creation of an independentcentral bank that was legally committed to refuse the government'sdemand or additional unsecured credit and, second, a simultaneousalteration in the fiscal policy regime.
In english: *hyperinflation stops when the central bank can say "no" to the government."
The US Fed, like other well good central banks, is run by a bunch of nerds. When it prints money, even as aggressively as it has it does so for good reasons. You can see why they started printing on March 15th as the COVID lockdowns started:
The Federal Reserve is prepared to use its full range of tools to support the flow of credit to households and businesses and thereby promote its maximum employment and price stability goals.
In english: We're going to keep printing and lowering rates until jobs are back and inflation is under control. If we print until the sun is blotted out, we'll print in the shade.

BTC is not gold

Gold is a good asset for doomsday-preppers. If society crashes, gold will still have value.
How do we know that?
Gold has held value throughout multiple historic catastrophes over thousands of years. It had value before and after the Bronze Age Collapse, the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and Gengis Khan being Gengis Khan.
Even if you erased humanity and started over, the new humans would still find gold to be economically valuable. When Europeans d̶i̶s̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ c̶o̶n̶q̶u̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ g̶e̶n̶o̶c̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ went to America, they found gold to be an important item over there too. This is about equivalent to finding humans on Alpha-Centauri and learning that they think gold is a good store of value as well.
Some people are puzzled at this: we don't even use gold for much! But it has great properties:
First, gold is hard to fake and impossible to manufacture. This makes it good to ascertain payment.
Second, gold doesnt react to oxygen, so it doesn't rust or tarnish. So it keeps value over time unlike most other materials.
Last, gold is pretty. This might sound frivolous, and you may not like it, but jewelry has actual value to humans.
It's no coincidence if you look at a list of the wealthiest families, a large number of them trade in luxury goods.
To paraphrase Veblen humans have a profound desire to signal social status, for the same reason peacocks have unwieldy tails. Gold is a great way to achieve that.
On the other hand, BTC lacks all these attributes. Its value is largely based on common perception of value. There are a few fundamental drivers of demand:
Apart from these, it's hard to argue that BTC will retain value throughout some sort of economic catastrophe.

BTC is really risky

One last statement from Michael Saylor I take offense to is this:
“We feel pretty confident that Bitcoin is less risky than holding cash, less risky than holding gold,” MicroStrategy CEO said in an interview
"BTC is less risky than holding cash or gold long term" is nonsense. We saw before that BTC is more volatile on face value, and that as long as the Fed isn't run by spider monkeys stacked in a trench coat, the inflation is likely to be within reasonable bounds.
But on top of this, BTC has Abrupt downside risks that normal currencies don't. Let's imagine a few:

Blockchain solutions are fundamentally inefficient

Blockchain was a genius idea. I still marvel at the initial white paper which is a great mix of economics and computer science.
That said, blockchain solutions make large tradeoffs in design because they assume almost no trust between parties. This leads to intentionally wasteful designs on a massive scale.
The main problem is that all transactions have to be validated by expensive computational operations and double checked by multiple parties. This means waste:
Many design problems can be mitigated by various improvements over BTC, but it remains that a simple database always works better than a blockchain if you can trust the parties to the transaction.
submitted by VodkaHaze to badeconomics [link] [comments]

The Bitcoin Halving - Deflation and Monetary Crisis- DATA DASH & ARCANE BEAR Intro 03 - Inflation, Deflation and Bitcoin - YouTube BITCOIN COLLAPSE? RECESSION - DEFLATION ft Ivan on Tech BITCOIN nach der KRISE? Erst DEFLATION dann INFLATION! Meine Meinung! Krypto News Deutsch Bitcoin & Litecoin: Inflation, Good or Bad

No, because (price) deflation isn't bad. When prices go down, you can buy more for less. That's good for people who either make money or save money. Its only bad for debtors who lose money, and those kinds of debtors should stop what they're doing anyway (because what they're doing is obviously inefficient if they're losing money). Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin. May 12, 2020. Facebook. Twitter . Pinterest. WhatsApp. Contrary to expectations, bitcoin could see a positive performance during a possible bout of global deflation if it acts not just as an investment asset, but as a medium of exchange and a perceived safe haven like gold. The top cryptocurrency by market value is widely considered to be a ... This would be doubly bad for bitcoin considering the number of people who buy bitcoin simply to hold onto it with the idea that the value will go up. Another problem for bitcoin is that there will ... Why Global Deflation May Not Be Bad News for Bitcoin. By: Marvin Nelson. On: April 24, 2020. In: deflation, ted spread. Tagged: Bitcoin, Deflation, Gold, Markets, Ted spread. With: 0 Comments. Contrary to expectations, bitcoin could see a positive performance during a possible bout of global deflation if it acts not just as an investment asset, but as a medium of exchange and a perceived safe ... Deflation Part 2: Is Bitcoin Price Deflation Good or Bad? By Coinbrief Last updated on January 2, 2018 at 00:00 1 Comment In part one of this two part series, we discussed the hard-coded deflationary nature of Bitcoin and examined whether or not the Bitcoin price has been deflationary in real life.

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The Bitcoin Halving - Deflation and Monetary Crisis- DATA DASH & ARCANE BEAR

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